The Shift: How Nonprofits can Engage a changing U.S. population

3 11 2011

2011 is the year of The Shift. We’re seeing a lot of changes happening in Austin, throughout Texas and America. Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you know the population trends are changing in every community across our nation and forming the New America. An America that is younger, growing and more diverse. This year, with the support of TANO, Austin Community Foundation, Sooch Foundation and others, I’ve had the opportunity to launch Engage501 and connect with many nonprofit leaders across Texas and equip them with strategies that will help them build relationships with Latino and Multicultural communities that will ultimately create fundraisers, board members, volunteers and advocates within these communities. It’s been a great experience connecting with nonprofits, learning about their successes and areas where they need help, and I look forward to continuing the conversation.

Want to get started? Read my article on The Shift.

The Shift: What nonprofits can do to engage a changing U.S. population

By Mando Rayo

In case you’ve been under a rock, you should know that right now we’re on the verge of a major population shift, and your organization may not be ready.

The shift is this: According to the most recent Census brief, “Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin 2010,” both the Hispanic and Asian populations grew by 43 percent. Consider the fact that “America’s minorities account for an estimated 85 percent of U.S. population growth over the last decade” and more than half of the increase is due to the Latino population, which is now at 50.5 Million. (*U.S. Census) These numbers tell the story of a new America; America that is becoming more multicultural and interweaving our histories, traditions, cultures and people into a new nation.

To say that nonprofits aren’t ready for this shift implies that nonprofits don’t already engage this population, at least not as donors, board members, volunteers and advocates. For many nonprofits, it’s hard to visualize more minorities on this side of the table. But at the same time, we must also questions whether we’re serving these populations as best we can. If we’re not connecting with those who can help us, why would we assume we’re reaching all of those who need us?

This is not an obstacle, it’s an enormous opportunity.

By engaging and building trust with Latinos, African-Americans, Asians and all diverse populations, nonprofits stand to benefit from authentic leadership on their board that goes beyond tokenism, fundraising opportunities that have gone untapped by mainstream organizations, increased awareness and engagement with services, programs and volunteer activities and relevance in a growing multicultural America.

In order for nonprofits to truly achieve their missions, they need diverse insights, perspectives, influence, connections, fundraisers, and advocates and by engaging and creating meaningful relationships with these communities, we begin to improve all communities across America.

As we know when we build trust with volunteers and donors, they are more likely to give even more of their time, talent and treasure. A few fundraising examples include $1 Million raised with low wage workers through United Way and local grocer-HEB, $125,000 raised through what might be the first Hispanic giving circle in the country, FuturoFund Austin and nationally, $4.7 Million raised with a Spanish radio telethon with Univision and St. Jude’s Hospital.

Now let’s get practical. What can nonprofits do now to engage with these multicultural communities? Here are some suggestions:

Start today. You don’t have to have a perfect plan, you just to do it; reach out and be authentic in your approach.

Connect with the culture. When you understand and honor peoples’ culture, traditions and histories, you get closer to building trust and connecting with them in meaningful ways.  Take time to understand peoples’ backgrounds, experiences and motivations. Remember, multicultural groups are not monolithic.

Build relationships. If you’re looking for board members, build relationships with formal and informal leaders from these communities. Don’t just go with the usual suspects, reach out to new and upcoming leaders. Connect and collaborate with cultural groups and organizations that are deep-rooted in these communities.

Be a resource. Think about how your organization can be a resource to these communities. Take time to understand their needs, wants and aspirations. It’s about meeting their needs, your organizations’ needs and meeting in the middle or reaching the sweet spot. Once you hit the sweet spot, you can move forward together.

Understand your market. Be clear on whom you’re trying to engage and the best strategies to reach them. To reach young professionals, use leadership opportunities, social events and online networks; to reach families, be flexible and utilize family friendly activities and to reach new immigrants, utilize church networks and Spanish language media.

Make your organizational brand multicultural friendly. Show the diversity of your organization, leaders and people you serve through your marketing materials. It’s important to balance how you showcase the people you serve and your organization’s leadership; show how multicultural communities are contributing to your mission; don’t just show them as recipients of services. Understand that your organization might have to go through a change to become more multicultural friendly. You might have to implement changes in your board structure or in how you deliver your services.

Go to the people. It’s an age-old approach that works. Find out where people formally and informally gather. Sometimes it’ll be online via social networks and other times it’ll be at local community center or church. At first they’ll ask “what are they doing here” and as you build the trust, they’re going to be asking “why aren’t they here?”

Be committed. Show up often and when it matters. Be committed for the long-haul and show you have their best interest at heart. Don’t just outreach; engage people in the process. Be authentic and show that you care and you’ll be on your way to recruiting the biggest advocates with these communities.

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Mando Rayo is vp of engagement at Cultural Strategies and board member and founder of Engage 501, a multicultural engagement initiative at Texas Association of Nonprofit Organizations (TANO).





The New Philanthropists: Fundraising with Diverse Populations

12 08 2011
This week I was at a GivingCity gathering. We were discussing all things nonprofit and of course, the hot topics were fundraising and board diversity. Well, we were also giving props to Monica Williams for another amazing issue of GivingCity Magazine. She makes philanthropy look good! So back to “the opportunity.” If you know my work, I’m all about opening doors; in this case, doors to passionate people that aren’t normally asked to give. There are a lot of assumptions out there about Latinos and African-Americans and their take on philanthropy and as most of us know, if you don’t ask, you’re not going to get it. One of the reasons why communities of color may not give to “mainstream” nonprofits is because they do not have relationships with these organizations. So, there is the opportunity; the opportunity to start forming relationships and find ways to cultivate donors within Latino and African-American communities. Start today and join us for our next Engage501 learning session!
The New Philanthropists: Fundraising with Diverse Populations 
Tuesday, August 23, 2011
9:00am – 12:00pm
Sponsored by Austin Community Foundation
4315 Guadalupe, Suite 300
Austin, TX 78751
In partnership with:
Session Descripton:
The face of philanthropy is changing. The New Philanthropists are innovative, creative, and multi-generational; they have strong cultural identities, and they are ready to invest in causes, issues and nonprofit organizations. They are the future workforce, consumers and community leaders of Texas. According to Selig Center/Multicultural Economy Report, Hispanic/Latino ($181 billion), African-American ($72 billion), and Asian ($34 billion) buying power is well over $287 billion combined, creating a wealth of fundraising opportunities for organizations throughout Texas. In order for nonprofit organizations to remain relevant with these diverse populations, they need to understand, engage and create relationships with these communities. Learn ways to create meaningful relationships with the New Philanthropists.  Gain greater understanding of their motivations, culture and giving patterns, while learning to identify influencers (individuals and groups), opportunities and barriers.
Featured presenters include:
Celeste Guzman, Fundraiser, University of Texas at Austin
MaryBeth Gasman, Professor, University of Pennsylvania
Mando Rayo, VP, Engagement at Cultural Strategies
Nelson Bowman, Director of Development at                   Prairie View A&M

				




No Digital Divide Here: RISE Multicultural Series Tech Sessions

4 03 2011

Well, we still have some work to do but maybe the RISE Multicultural Series tech session hosts can help! Meanwhile, check out the sessions in full color! ;)

The 2011 Multicultural Series features a great line up of session hosts from the Latino, African-American, Asian and many diverse communities. The Series opens doors to diverse communities in a welcoming, engaging and inclusive environment.

Click here to learn more about the Multicultural Series!

Technology sessions:

Cindy Casares: How to manage bloggers including yourself

Chin Chang: Building a united website

Magaly Chocano: Marketing your business in the mobile landscape

Lisa Goddard: Mapping the Un-mappable: Using infographics to inspire social change

Ricardo Guererro: How to use social media effectively for your business

Elias Hermida: Use Technology to Reach Hispanics

Vid Luther: How to hack your startup without writing a single line of code

Quamrul Mina: Building a cloud-based Online/OnDemand TV broadcast platform

Thomas Miranda: Innovation – What’s the Big Idea

Jette Momant: Socialize and localize your business

Jennifer Navarette: Business on the Go: Smartphones, iPads and Apps, OH MY!

Pablo Reyna : What is this cloud stuff?

Luis Sandoval: Diversifying your integrated media strategy

Nicole Torres-Cooke: The Strategy of Being Social Online

Jikku Venkat: Product Development & Technology Innovation in a Startup Environment: Doing it Cost-effectively






Donate Anywhere for FuturoFund

20 10 2010

Si Se Puede..donate anywhere! I’m part of a national online fundraising effort to make giving easier through Razoo’s DonateAnywhere widget. See the link on the side bar—->

Razoo and the ‘zooGooders Council, a group of nonprofit and philanthropy leaders across the U.S. are joining forces to use the widget to raise money for their favorite charity. I’ll be helping FuturoFund Austin.

Por Que FuturoFund? Latinos are the fastest growing population in the U.S. and are the future philanthropic and civic leaders in communities across America. I want to help Latinos do their part in giving back to ALL communities. Futuro Fund Austin will inspire and help Latinos step up, lead and give to their communities.

Por que Razoo? They’ve raised millions of dollars nationwide and the DonateAnywhere widget is new and innovative tool that will make giving a lot easier.

Ready to help FuturoFund Austin? Click on the DonateAnywhere button!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the press release here.

Here’s the zooGooder Council…

The ’zooGooders (http://blog.razoo.com/zoogooder/) include the following organizations and thought leaders:

Andre Blackman of Pulse and Signal at http://pulseandsignal.com/

Tom Dawkins of Out There and Back Again at http://tomjd.wordpress.com/

Nicole D’Alonzo of Niki’s Notes, http://nikisnotes.com/

Abby Flottemesch of Atlas Corps at http:// http://www.atlascorps.org

John Haydon of his eponymous blog, http://www.johnhaydon.com/

Jessica Kirkwood of Hands on Network at http://handsonblog.org/

Rachel Matthews of A Southern Fairy Tale at http://asouthernfairytale.com/

Armando Rayo of Cultural Strategies/El Mundo de Mando, http://elmundodemando.wordpress.com/

Jennifer Roccanti of Miriam’s Kitchen at http://www.miriamskitchen.org

Amber Rodriguez of Noah’s Kitchen at http://noahskitchen.wordpress.com/

Jenna Sauber at Lagniappe at http://jennasauber.com/

Andy Sternberg of his eponymous blog, http://andysternberg.com/

Andrea Weckerle of CiviliNation at http://civilination.org/supportdonate/

Jennifer Windrum of WTF Lung Cancer at http://www.wtflungcancer.com






Proyecto Mosaico: 500 years of American Latino contributions

6 04 2010

Today the Austin American-Statesman published a story on Proyecto Mosaico. There’s a group in Austin that wants to bring a National Museum of the American Latino to Austin. Would that be a good fit for Austin? The group that is advocating for the museum seems to think so! Luckily, I have insider’s knowledge. Our friends at Hahn, Texas are working on the project along with a very impressive leadership committee. You may also be wondering why Austin? We’re not San Antonio, Chicago or L.A. Well, I went right to the source and asked. Here’s the information I gathered on Proyecto Mosaico.

There’s a group in Austin on a mission to locate the potential National Museum of the American Latino in Austin, Texas.

The Commission to Study the Potential Creation of a National Museum of the American Latino (National Museum) was signed into law (Public Law 110-229 [S.2739]) in 2008. The Commission members are tasked with studying the feasibility of creating this museum in the nation’s capital, but the National Mall is physically full.

The National Museum would provide a home for the historical artifacts, images and personal stories documenting over 500 years of American Latino contributions to the United States and it would serve as an educational tool for the thousands of anticipated visitors and instill a sense of pride in the Latino community today and in the future.

The big question is why Austin, Texas?

Nearly one in five U.S. Latinos lives in Texas—more than 8.5 million people. Eight of the nation’s top 25 counties for Latino population are in Texas, with each having more than 300,000 Latino residents; and Travis County, where Austin is located, is one of those counties. Austin is the capital of Texas and lies just west of the historic El Camino Real de los Tejas Trail, the “Crossroads of Cultures” and is on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Highway.

Austin and the Hill Country draw visitors from around the globe to its natural, cultural and lifestyle landmarks like the State Capitol, Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum, Blanton Museum of Art, Texas Memorial Museum, Barton Springs, Highland Lakes, SXSW, ACL Festival and many others. Austin also is a globally recognized center of scholarship, innovation and creativity with the University of Texas and it’s renowned Teresa Lozano Long Institute Latin American Studies program, the Mexican American Cultural Center, Mexic-Arte Museum, among others. And, Austin has a wonderfully blended Latino culture and demographic—a complete Latino mosaic.

Several influential leaders and academics have committed to participate in the National Museum recruitment effort.

  • The Honorable Mike Martinez, Austin Mayor Pro Tem (Chair)
  • Dr. Francisco de la Teja: Texas State University (Co-Chair)
  • Dr. Jose Limon: University of Texas (Co-Chair)
  • Robert Hicks Navarro: Camino Real
  • Andy Martinez: Greater Austin Hispanic Chamber
  • Anna Sanchez: Wells Fargo Bank
  • Luis Patino: Univision-Austin
  • Patty Gonzales: Public Affairs Director – Hahn, Texas

The group will make a presentation to the Commission in the next few weeks. We invite you to join the cause by following Proyecto Mosaico on Facebook or visit the website at www.mosaicomuseum.com.

To read the story on the Austin American Statesman, click on the link below…

Could Austin be home to a national Latino Museum?

Mando

vp, engagement

Cultural Strategies








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