The Shift: How Nonprofits can Engage a changing U.S. population

3 11 2011

2011 is the year of The Shift. We’re seeing a lot of changes happening in Austin, throughout Texas and America. Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you know the population trends are changing in every community across our nation and forming the New America. An America that is younger, growing and more diverse. This year, with the support of TANO, Austin Community Foundation, Sooch Foundation and others, I’ve had the opportunity to launch Engage501 and connect with many nonprofit leaders across Texas and equip them with strategies that will help them build relationships with Latino and Multicultural communities that will ultimately create fundraisers, board members, volunteers and advocates within these communities. It’s been a great experience connecting with nonprofits, learning about their successes and areas where they need help, and I look forward to continuing the conversation.

Want to get started? Read my article on The Shift.

The Shift: What nonprofits can do to engage a changing U.S. population

By Mando Rayo

In case you’ve been under a rock, you should know that right now we’re on the verge of a major population shift, and your organization may not be ready.

The shift is this: According to the most recent Census brief, “Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin 2010,” both the Hispanic and Asian populations grew by 43 percent. Consider the fact that “America’s minorities account for an estimated 85 percent of U.S. population growth over the last decade” and more than half of the increase is due to the Latino population, which is now at 50.5 Million. (*U.S. Census) These numbers tell the story of a new America; America that is becoming more multicultural and interweaving our histories, traditions, cultures and people into a new nation.

To say that nonprofits aren’t ready for this shift implies that nonprofits don’t already engage this population, at least not as donors, board members, volunteers and advocates. For many nonprofits, it’s hard to visualize more minorities on this side of the table. But at the same time, we must also questions whether we’re serving these populations as best we can. If we’re not connecting with those who can help us, why would we assume we’re reaching all of those who need us?

This is not an obstacle, it’s an enormous opportunity.

By engaging and building trust with Latinos, African-Americans, Asians and all diverse populations, nonprofits stand to benefit from authentic leadership on their board that goes beyond tokenism, fundraising opportunities that have gone untapped by mainstream organizations, increased awareness and engagement with services, programs and volunteer activities and relevance in a growing multicultural America.

In order for nonprofits to truly achieve their missions, they need diverse insights, perspectives, influence, connections, fundraisers, and advocates and by engaging and creating meaningful relationships with these communities, we begin to improve all communities across America.

As we know when we build trust with volunteers and donors, they are more likely to give even more of their time, talent and treasure. A few fundraising examples include $1 Million raised with low wage workers through United Way and local grocer-HEB, $125,000 raised through what might be the first Hispanic giving circle in the country, FuturoFund Austin and nationally, $4.7 Million raised with a Spanish radio telethon with Univision and St. Jude’s Hospital.

Now let’s get practical. What can nonprofits do now to engage with these multicultural communities? Here are some suggestions:

Start today. You don’t have to have a perfect plan, you just to do it; reach out and be authentic in your approach.

Connect with the culture. When you understand and honor peoples’ culture, traditions and histories, you get closer to building trust and connecting with them in meaningful ways.  Take time to understand peoples’ backgrounds, experiences and motivations. Remember, multicultural groups are not monolithic.

Build relationships. If you’re looking for board members, build relationships with formal and informal leaders from these communities. Don’t just go with the usual suspects, reach out to new and upcoming leaders. Connect and collaborate with cultural groups and organizations that are deep-rooted in these communities.

Be a resource. Think about how your organization can be a resource to these communities. Take time to understand their needs, wants and aspirations. It’s about meeting their needs, your organizations’ needs and meeting in the middle or reaching the sweet spot. Once you hit the sweet spot, you can move forward together.

Understand your market. Be clear on whom you’re trying to engage and the best strategies to reach them. To reach young professionals, use leadership opportunities, social events and online networks; to reach families, be flexible and utilize family friendly activities and to reach new immigrants, utilize church networks and Spanish language media.

Make your organizational brand multicultural friendly. Show the diversity of your organization, leaders and people you serve through your marketing materials. It’s important to balance how you showcase the people you serve and your organization’s leadership; show how multicultural communities are contributing to your mission; don’t just show them as recipients of services. Understand that your organization might have to go through a change to become more multicultural friendly. You might have to implement changes in your board structure or in how you deliver your services.

Go to the people. It’s an age-old approach that works. Find out where people formally and informally gather. Sometimes it’ll be online via social networks and other times it’ll be at local community center or church. At first they’ll ask “what are they doing here” and as you build the trust, they’re going to be asking “why aren’t they here?”

Be committed. Show up often and when it matters. Be committed for the long-haul and show you have their best interest at heart. Don’t just outreach; engage people in the process. Be authentic and show that you care and you’ll be on your way to recruiting the biggest advocates with these communities.

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Mando Rayo is vp of engagement at Cultural Strategies and board member and founder of Engage 501, a multicultural engagement initiative at Texas Association of Nonprofit Organizations (TANO).





Sustainability and Latinos

15 04 2011

Last week I had the opportunity to share my perspectives on social equity, Latinos and the sustainability movement at the Go Green Conference. While we still need to change behaviors in the Latino community, it is important to also change perspectives within the sustainability movement. If you’re interested in learning about what I mean when I say “changing perspectives,” continue reading…

Sustainability and Latinos

By Mando Rayo

When you think of sustainability, the environment and going “green”, what comes to mind? Is it the conscious-minded people who chooses alternative transportation, recycles and grows their own veggies? Or is it the person who lives in the city but has agriculture in their family history, tends to multiple chickens and roosters and rides their bicycle to and from work because they have no alternatives? I think of the latter.

Even though you can’t help but walk through a minefield when making generalization about any demographic and/or ethnicity in America, there are certain realities that I invite you to ponder; new information that will make you at the very least reconsider the assumptions you make when running into certain sub-segments of the Latino market.

Let me expand.

Culture, Traditions and History

Among Latino and other sustainability is a very familiar concept, in fact, it’s goes back many generations. My grandparents and their grandparents before them, farmed and cultivated their lands with vegetables, fruits and the foods they needed to feed their families and make a living. In the kitchen, they developed and passed on traditions to the next generation including reusing plastic bags and foil paper and creating new dishes from a hodge podge of leftover items. These practices, often starting out of necessity, have become traditions and part of our culture. Among Latinos and especially those in low-income communities, you have to save where you can in order to provide for your family—you have to conserve. While many Latinos may not label themselves “green,” they actually are; they just don’t do it by definition, they do it because it’s a part of their culture.

Choice vs. Necessity

Is the construction worker who rides his bicycle to work going “green” or does he do it because of necessity? How many of us are afforded the choice to leave the car at home and ride our bikes to work or for recreational purposes? Do you consider people in low-income communities as environmentally-friendly because they ride the bus? You could. A lot of us, including myself, are afforded these choices but many Latinos and African-Americans that are living in poverty do not have the luxury to make these choices. For Latinos living in these conditions, it is a matter of necessity; the necessity to get to work, make a living, getting by and providing for their families. With necessity comes ingenuity. We see it in its simplest form by recycling plastic bags and foil paper, by washing and reusing them, or by repurposing old aluminum cans or glass jars for tools and containers and even art projects. While some Latinos, especially older generations, may not consider themselves environmentalist, many of them have been doing their part through culture and traditions.

Creating Inclusion

Sustainability and the organized environmental movement for the large part has been part of the mainstream. The poor and multicultural communities have not been part of this organized movement not because they’ve been intentionally excluded, but simply because not enough relationships and connections exist between these groups. Latinos and most multicultural communities do care about sustainability and doing their part to be “green”. However,  they do it in their own informal way, rooted in cultural traditions and understandings. What organizations and businesses need to do is begin the process of understanding how these issues affect and are relevant to Latino communities. If they truly want diverse insights, perspectives, influence, connections, advocates, and $171 billion of Texas’ Latino buying power the organized environmental movement needs to take time to understand their needs, wants and aspirations. It’s about meeting their necessities, your organization/business’ needs and meeting in the middle or reaching the sweet spot. Once you hit the sweet spot, you can move forward together.

There are real connections between sustainability and Latinos. As we continue this work, we have to change perceptions as well as behaviors and start connecting the issues in more meaningful and relevant ways that include culture, traditions and experiences.

There are definitely situations in which these same Latinos, due to either lack of information or out of pure necessity are engaging in practices negative to the environment. These are opportunities for both nonprofit organizations and the business world as far as educating and empowering these individuals to take environmentally-friendly decisions.






Donate Anywhere for FuturoFund

20 10 2010

Si Se Puede..donate anywhere! I’m part of a national online fundraising effort to make giving easier through Razoo’s DonateAnywhere widget. See the link on the side bar—->

Razoo and the ‘zooGooders Council, a group of nonprofit and philanthropy leaders across the U.S. are joining forces to use the widget to raise money for their favorite charity. I’ll be helping FuturoFund Austin.

Por Que FuturoFund? Latinos are the fastest growing population in the U.S. and are the future philanthropic and civic leaders in communities across America. I want to help Latinos do their part in giving back to ALL communities. Futuro Fund Austin will inspire and help Latinos step up, lead and give to their communities.

Por que Razoo? They’ve raised millions of dollars nationwide and the DonateAnywhere widget is new and innovative tool that will make giving a lot easier.

Ready to help FuturoFund Austin? Click on the DonateAnywhere button!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the press release here.

Here’s the zooGooder Council…

The ’zooGooders (http://blog.razoo.com/zoogooder/) include the following organizations and thought leaders:

Andre Blackman of Pulse and Signal at http://pulseandsignal.com/

Tom Dawkins of Out There and Back Again at http://tomjd.wordpress.com/

Nicole D’Alonzo of Niki’s Notes, http://nikisnotes.com/

Abby Flottemesch of Atlas Corps at http:// http://www.atlascorps.org

John Haydon of his eponymous blog, http://www.johnhaydon.com/

Jessica Kirkwood of Hands on Network at http://handsonblog.org/

Rachel Matthews of A Southern Fairy Tale at http://asouthernfairytale.com/

Armando Rayo of Cultural Strategies/El Mundo de Mando, http://elmundodemando.wordpress.com/

Jennifer Roccanti of Miriam’s Kitchen at http://www.miriamskitchen.org

Amber Rodriguez of Noah’s Kitchen at http://noahskitchen.wordpress.com/

Jenna Sauber at Lagniappe at http://jennasauber.com/

Andy Sternberg of his eponymous blog, http://andysternberg.com/

Andrea Weckerle of CiviliNation at http://civilination.org/supportdonate/

Jennifer Windrum of WTF Lung Cancer at http://www.wtflungcancer.com






Town of Clouds: Un Interview con Diego y Dany (vid)

11 06 2010

I love learning about people, history y culturas. And so working on this project has been right up my alley. I’m learning about the Huicholes (indigenous) people from the mountains for Jalisco, Mexico. Last week I interviewed Diego Huerta and Dany Gutierrez in preparation for Opening Night: Town of Clouds/Pueblo de las Nubes. Let me just say that Diego knows how to capture peoples’ souls. Just take a look at his work. Now let’s discover los Huicholes…

To learn more about the exhibit, visit Diego’s blog: www.diegohuerta.blogspot.com. You can join us on our Facebook event or RSVP at http://diegohuerta.eventbrite.com.





Opening Night: Town of Clouds – La Cultura de los Huicholes

2 06 2010

A couple of months ago, I met Diego Huerta and Dany Gutierrez at the offices of Hahn, Texas – Yes, they were the ones that made me look cool on the HT website! I’ve been getting to more involved in Diego’s work and have been thoroughly impressed by his commitment to his art, style and how he represents people with his photography. Diego told me about Town of Clouds and the Huichol people of Central Mexico and how he wanted to share their story to the good people of Austin, Texas y’all! So we brainstormed and brought together the Hahn, Texas and Cultural Strategies team to help support the opening and exhibit. Interested? Want to learn more? Read the Q&A with Diego Huerta and RSVP for Opening Night!

Q&A with Diego Huerta, Photographer

Can you tell me about the exhibit?
The exhibit is integrated by 43 photographs.
All of the photographs were taken in the town of San Andrés Cohamiata, Jalisco, México in May 2009.

The exhibit will be first opened in Austin, Texas during the month of June through the month of August. The photographs will be on sale and a 50% percentage of the funds will be dedicated to the community of the town of San Andrés in order to give them chaquira,wood and other materials for their crafts.

What about the people- why did you decide to do this project with them?

A year ago, when I lived in La Huasteca, Nuevo Leon, I noticed that the ritual site that had belonged so many years to the Huicholes had been closed down. Although it is not written on paper, the Huicholes have visited this ritual site for thousands of years considering it the center of the universe. Neighbors close to this site decided to shut it down and haven’t allowed them to celebrate their rituals anymore.

I looked to photograph them so modern society can recognize that there are ancient cultures with and customs and traditions and that such traditions should be acknowledged and respected.

Dany Gutierrez & Diego Huerta at the Huichol village

Tell me about the experience – What did you go through to get the project done?

First of all, we needed to plan the route to take. After a 2 day 16-hour drive, we got to the town. We also needed to give something in return, so days before we left to San Andrés, we asked for donations of food and clothes from family and friends. Being at San Andrés we had to approach the Governor to ask for permission to actually give our donations to the Huicholes. The Governor had to consult with the Elder Council. After a three-day period of waiting, we received approval to take move forward with the project. Along with the permission, we were invited to the annual ceremony that is held when the Governor steps down and gives the position to his successor.

The experience was incredible- we learned that you can never take what you have for granted. We also learned that life is easy and living it is just a day-to-day routine.

How can people learn more about the exhibit?

To learn more about the exhibit, visit Diego’s blog: www.diegohuerta.blogspot.com. We have videos, slidecasts and photos. You can join us on our Facebook event or RSVP at http://diegohuerta.eventbrite.com.

Anything else you’d like to add?

Come to the opening night on Saturday June 19 at the MACC. You will enjoy food, drinks and culture. You will also have an opportunity to help the people in San Andrés by buying the photographs. We hope to see you there!








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